Bill and Brandon Foundation

1 in 8 UK Men will be diagnosed with PROSTATE CANCER in their lifetime

In the UK, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men.

Across the country, there are more than 333,500 men living with and beyond the disease. Many are dealing with serious side effects from treatment.

MEN’S HEALTH IS IN CRISIS

Men’s health is in crisis. Men are dying on average 6 years earlier than women, and for largely preventable reasons.

Unchecked, prostate cancer rates will double over the next 15 years. Globally, testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 15-39 years of age. And across the world, one man dies by suicide every minute of every day, with males accounting for 75% of all suicides.

BY 2030, WE AIM TO REDUCE THE NUMBER OF MEN DYING PREMATURELY BY 15% 

For starters, half as many men dying from prostate cancer and testicular cancer. Half as many men suffering serious side effects as a result of treatment. Men feeling mentally healthy and well, resulting in a 15% reduction in the rate of male suicide.

HOW WE WILL MAKE A CHANGE

  • Give men the facts
  • Change behaviour for the better
  • Create services that work for men
  • Unite the brightest minds
  • Listen to the community and advocate for men.

 

PROSTATE CANCER is the most commonly diagnosed CANCER IN MEN IN THE UK. Know the facts and take action early

 

 

EARLY DETECTION IS KEY.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN EARLY DETECTION AND LATE DETECTION CAN BE LIFE AND DEATH.

WHO’S AT RISK?

Your risk of developing prostate cancer increases with age, but that doesn’t mean it’s a disease that only affects old men. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Men who are black, and men who have a family history (a brother or father with prostate cancer), are 2.5x more likely to get prostate cancer.

If you’re 50, you should be talking to your doctor about Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing. If you’re black, you need to start that conversation at 45. And if you have a brother or father with prostate cancer in their history, do it at 45.

WHAT’S A PSA TEST?

It’s a simple routine blood test.

It’s used to determine the measurement of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) concentration in the blood, it is the primary method of testing for prostate cancer. You should be talking to your doctor about whether testing is right for you.

 

THE FACTS ABOUT PROSTATE CANCER

Only men have a prostate gland. The prostate gland is usually the size and shape of a walnut and grows bigger as you get older. It sits underneath the bladder and surrounds the urethra, which is the tube men urinate and ejaculate through. Its main job is to help make semen – the fluid that carries sperm.

Prostate cancer occurs when some of the cells in the prostate reproduce far more rapidly than normal, resulting in a tumour. Prostate cancer often grows slowly to start with and may never cause any problems. But some men have prostate cancer that is more likely to spread. These prostate cancer cells, if left untreated, may spread from the prostate and invade distant parts of the body, particularly the lymph nodes and bones, producing secondary tumours in a process known as metastasis.

DETECTING PROSTATE CANCER

Not everyone experiences symptoms of prostate cancer. Many times, signs of prostate cancer are first detected by a doctor during a routine check-up.

Some men, however, will experience changes in urinary or sexual function that might indicate the presence of prostate cancer.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

  • A need to urinate frequently, especially at night
  • Difficulty starting urination or holding back urine
  • Weak or interrupted flow of urine
  • Painful or burning urination
  • Difficulty in having an erection
  • Painful ejaculation
  • Blood in urine or semen
  • Frequent pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, or upper thighs

TREATING PROSTATE CANCER

Treatment options are many and varied. Testing still can’t answer lots of key questions about disease aggression, prognosis and progression.

If you have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, it's important to keep in mind that many prostate cancers are slow growing and may not need surgery or other radical treatment.

TREATMENT OPTIONS include:

  • Active Surveillance
  • Prostatectomy
  • Radiotherapy
  • Hormone Therapy
  • Chemotherapy

Choosing a treatment for prostate cancer

Aim to be ok with the treatment decision you make, take risks and benefits into consideration.

Learn what you can, make use of the quality services and resources available. When making treatment decisions the following is recommended:

  • Make a decision after a treatment recommendation from a multi-disciplinary meeting (where available). This meeting would ideally consist of input from the following specialists: urologists, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, radiologist, nursing and allied health.
  • Seek a second opinion for a recommended treatment option that is right for you, from both a urologist as well as a radiation oncologist.
  • Enquire as to whether a specialist is part of a quality improvement audit, such as a registry.
  • Utilise the cancer support services available in your country to increase your levels of information and understanding around treatment options, and potential side effects. Phone Prostate Cancer UK specialist nurses on 0800 074 8383 or visit their website. https://prostatecanceruk.org/prostate-information/treatments
  • Approach your GP if you have concerns or want a second opinion.

Ongoing side effects of prostate cancer treatment

Depending on the treatment you undergo, you may experience some of the following:

  • Incontinence (involuntary leakage of urine)
  • Erectile dysfunction (difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection)
  • Weight gain due to hormone therapy
  • Depression

These side effects have different durations for different people.

Because a side effect of treatment may include erectile dysfunction, prostate cancer can have a serious impact on intimate relationships. As many people who have been through the journey will tell you, prostate cancer isn’t just a man’s disease, it’s a couple’s disease. Make sure you involve your partner as you think through the various treatment options.

Are you experiencing side effects?

There are treatments and actions you can take to manage many of these side effects. Take action to improve your quality of life. Go to Prostate Cancer UK, who have a wide variety of options to inform and guide you as to what services and resources are available to help.

More support and resources

Prostate Cancer UK (PCUK)

Prostate Cancer UK aim to help more men survive prostate cancer and enjoy a better quality of life

 

TESTICULAR CANCER

At greater than 95%, the odds of survival for men with testicular cancer are better than good-but for some men, long-term treatment-related side effects mean quality of life is severely compromised. We focus on getting these predominantly young back to living full and healthy lives.

TESTICULAR CANCER STRIKES YOUNG.

In United Kingdom, testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in young men.

 

SO, KNOW YOUR NUTS. IT’S THAT SIMPLE.

The best thing you can do for your testicles is give them a bit of a feel each month or so, and if something doesn’t seem right, head to the doctor.

 

MOST AT RISK POPULATION

WHO’S AT RISK?

In United Kingdom, testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in young men.

Men with undescended testes at birth, or who have a family history, like a father or brother who has had testicular cancer, are at an increased risk. And if you’ve had testicular cancer before, there’s also a heightened risk it could return.

THE FACTS ABOUT TESTICULAR CANCER

Testicles are responsible for the production of male hormones (mostly testosterone) and sperm. Testicular cancer starts as an abnormal growth or tumour that develops in one or both testicles. There are several types of testicular cancer, but the most common is the germ cell tumour.

If you've been diagnosed with testicular cancer

The most important step is to talk to your doctor about treatment choices. You may consider getting a second or third doctor’s opinion.

TREATMENT OPTIONS

Testicular cancer is a highly treatable cancer and can be effectively treated, and often cured, if diagnosed and treated early. Advanced testicular cancer can also be cured with treatment including:

  • Orchiectomy (surgical removal of the affected testis), done under general anesthetic
  • Chemotherapy or radiotherapy, often prescribed after surgery to treat any remaining cancer cells that may have spread to other parts of the body, such as lymph nodes

Side effects

Testicular cancer and the removal of one testicle should not alter your ability to have sex or have children. The effect on fertility following removal of one of the testicles is minimal as a single testicle produces such large numbers of sperm. Men with testicular cancer should talk to their oncologist about sperm banking before commencing chemotherapy or radiation therapy.